Blog

Women's Fund of Rhode Island

05-02-2022
Mischa Downing
What makes a leader stand out in 2022?
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03-11-2022
Cathy Nestrick
10 Actions to Break the Bias for Greater Gender Parity
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02-17-2022
Shari Weinberger
Rhode Island is a fantastically rich environment for women, working with the art world AND creating art.
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11-15-2021
Abigail Turano
COVID caused a she-cession, where women have left the workforce in droves and many may not return. This post offers some reasons why and solutions to helping women come back to the workforce.
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08-27-2021
Samantha Wilner
I spent the last eight weeks working at Women’s Fund of Rhode Island (WFRI), learning about the hard work it takes to run an incredibly successful nonprofit organization. It requires interpersonal skills, organizational skills, and a proactive attitude. It also requires a belief in the power of systems change, a belief that guides WFRI’s social justice work. Their Women’s Policy Institute is a perfect example of this commitment. This nine-month professional development and mentoring program helps women develop and advocate for policies that advance gender equity in Rhode Island. I was so inspired by this program that I sat down with one of its facilitators, Paula Hodges, to learn more about it’s day-to-day operations and goals.
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08-03-2021
Ella Mordarski
In the past year, many women and girls experienced changes in their mental health and seeking support due to COVID-19. Isolation, along with fear and loss, has caused an increase in stress and anxiety among women. Unable to cope with the ongoing changes alone, many women sought help for mental health issues. In early November, Kathryn Power, the director of the Rhode Island Department of Behavioral Healthcare, said that there had been a 15 to 20 percent increase in calls from all demographics coming into their triage center.
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05-20-2021
Imogene Johnson
My time as an intern at Women’s Fund of Rhode Island has been full of learning experiences. Above all, I’ve learned the power and importance of volunteers. Between studying political science and attending a historically women’s college, I have always been passionate about gender equity. I was so excited to apply this passion to the incredible work WFRI does, and my internship has been even more engaging and educational than I anticipated. What I did not know when I started, though, is just how many and just how passionate Rhode Islanders are about gender equity too.
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04-16-2021
Kylie Lynn
In today’s modern world, American women still contend with substantial gender pay gaps. Rhode Island Women’s Well-Being Index reveals that women make up 64% of the workforce in the lowest-paying jobs in Rhode Island alone. These gaps aren’t exclusive to just the state – female employees across America suffer lifetime wage losses, and the disparities are even more significant in women of color: White women have around $451,300 of lifetime wage loss, Asian women around $607,100, Black women around $997,000, and Latina women around $1,213,700. It’s imperative that all women get equity in the workplace, primarily since 70% of American households with children rely on the woman’s income. What's more, women bear most of the responsibility of home maintenance and caregiving at home – all while holding jobs. As such, they should be valued as capable professionals.
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04-09-2021
Caylin Luebeck
Content Warning: Rape. On March 26th, 2021, a new bill was introduced in the Rhode Island State Legislative. Bill 249 would create the “criteria for the criminal offense of sexual assault when the victim is in the custody of a peace officer.” This begs several questions: how often are these so-called peace officers sexually assaulting those in custody? Is this a widespread issue that has gone unnoticed? And who is a peace officer?
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04-06-2021
Carol Smith
It’s no secret that girls and young women face more of an uphill climb compared to their male counterparts, particularly with speaking up and being heard.  And everyone suffers a psychological toll when they feel silenced, but especially children.  They are still learning and shaping their world.  Behaviors are internalized and patterns are established.  That’s why it’s so important to make sure that girls and young women know that they have the right to be heard.  Even if the very people in her life, intentionally or unintentionally, communicate to her that it’s not so.  After all, those same oppressive, societal patterns were present when their mothers or female role models were growing up.
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