Blog

Women's Fund of Rhode Island

09-24-2019
Farah Faye
The day I experienced the most extreme case of bias in my career was supposed to be a typical day. I was giving a presentation to a group of middle-aged investors, some of whom I had known from previous business experiences. They were all men, but I was used to that. In Fintech (financial technology), you're always presenting to a group of men.
Read More >>
09-17-2019
Tim Lehnert
The Women’s Fund of Rhode Island (WFRI) recently announced $50,000 in grant funding to five organizations. WFRI was launched in 2001, and since then its WFRI Grant Program has awarded more than $700,000 to Rhode Island organizations and programs empowering women and girls. In the most recent cycle of funding, prospective grantees were asked to focus on one or more of WFRI’s 2019 advocacy priorities, which include disparities for Women of Color, economic justice and reproductive health and freedom.
Read More >>
08-22-2019
Kelly Nevins
Monday, August 26 is Women's Equality Day, commemorating the passage of the 19th Amendment. A century ago, women in this country were not allowed to vote, yet many Americans take that right for granted today. One out of three eligible women fails to exercise her right (CAWP, 2019).
Read More >>
08-05-2019
Paula Hodges
My work in the common good and political advocacy sectors are defined by the women who brought me up in the world. My impatience stems from seeing the slow pace of change for gender norms in the home where I grew up. My career was unfathomable as a naive Missouri farm girl. Then I met Mindy. She was a pay-it-forward manager and chief of staff who hired me as an intern and wouldn't let me go. She coached and navigated me around every career pivot and barrier. Networks are a constellation of mentors, pipelines, alma maters - professional and personal associations. Often these networks are implicit. They expand the obstacles that divide those who were born into the norms of public service and those of us who stumble upon public service after strife and righteous indignation call us to change the world.
Read More >>
07-30-2019
Emily Pera
As a woman in corporate America, I’ve been both personally and professionally invested in the question of female representation in board rooms. The level of dialogue on this critical issue has never been higher.  However, has there been enough action taken? Where are we on the journey from awareness to diagnosis to formulation to action to a resolution?
Read More >>
07-09-2019
Kelly Nevins
The USA World Cup win has put the need for fair pay policies back into discussion. Of course, the usual arguments against this concept are also in play, with the idea that pay differentials are tied to differing commercial values between men’s and women’s sports and that there are different pay structures for performing different work. It remains to be seen whether the U.S. Women’s National Team will be successful in their gender discrimination suit against the U.S. Soccer Federation.
Read More >>
06-13-2019
Reverend DL Helfer minister of UUCSC
We’ve all witnessed it – state after state restricts access to birth control and abortion, and undermine other hard-won and rightful reproductive freedoms. Much of the South and some Midwestern states are implementing draconian policies without consideration for the impact on women’s health or self-determination. A few, mostly coastal or traditionally more progressive states, are opting instead to legislate proactively to protect these rights. Here in Rhode Island, we're fighting hard to enshrine the current level of access to abortion, one already not sufficiently inclusive.
Read More >>
04-02-2019
Kelly Nevins Executive Director Women's Fund of Rhode Island
April 2 is “Equal Pay Day” and represents how far into the year U.S. women must work to earn what men earned in the previous year. It’s important to note that the date differs when we segment by ethnicity. Black women’s equal pay day is August 22 and for Latina women, it is Nov. 20.Studies done by the Association of American University Women and the National Bureau of Economic Research, while recognizing that some of the wage gap is due to occupational segregation and family care choices, also
Read More >>
03-18-2019
Emily J Sack WFRI Board Member
Moving Women from the End of the Chapter: The Continuing Challenges of Women’s History Emily J. Sack -- WFRI Board MemberAs a history graduate student in the early 1980s, I met with an archivist at the French National Archives to discuss my proposed research project, which related to women during the French Revolution. The archivist regretfully explained to me that in the archival cataloguing system for that time period, there was no entry for women. In order to find materials on my subject, I
Read More >>
03-11-2019
Kathleen Rose
When the #MeToo movement exploded last year, I think nearly every woman could think of their own personal #MeToo story to share, big or small. Recently, I listened to an episode of the On Being podcast where Krista Tipett interviewed Rebecca Traister and Avi Klein about the #MeToo movement through a solutions lens (https://onbeing.org/programs/rebecca-traister-and-avi-klein-metoo-through-a-solutions-lens-dec2018/).A few things that stood out to me while I was listening were the fact that the
Read More >>
02-11-2019
Jordan Hevenor CoDirector of The Womxn Project
I will be honest. I pondered whether I would watch the “State of the Union”. I knew I would cringe at the hateful rhetoric about immigrant communities and roll my eyes at claims that the current administration’s policies are making our country great in spite of the fact that they have pushed policies to deny health coverage for reproductive health care, roll back protections for transgender people, and block the availability of federal funds for family planning providers. But feeling the need to
Read More >>
11-20-2018
Christina Castle WFRI Board Member
Many of us, especially women, are still “riding the high” of the recent midterm election, in which women candidates showed up like never before to run for governor, U.S. House seats, and U.S. Senate seats. We also saw some individual victories – like Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, youngest woman elected to Congress, who many of us have been watching intently since she first made a splash on the national stage.Rhode Island saw victories for women, and progress toward equality, too. Women increased
Read More >>
11-14-2018
Krystal Sarcone Volunteer
Like many noble causes, we often designate an annual day or month of observation for national attention and awareness, and October was National Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Symbolized by the purple ribbon, last month’s opportunity to reflect on the impact of domestic violence in our community and state is nothing to take lightly as more than 20,000 phone calls are placed to domestic violence hotlines across the nation on a daily basis (2013 census data presented by National Coalition
Read More >>
11-14-2018
Lauren Tutuny WFRI Volunteer
The word “feminism” has worn the hat of many titles and tones, from heavy to light, from positive to negative, clichéd and slightly misunderstood. Before people even truly understood what the word meant, which today rightfully stands for equitable human rights for all people; the lack of knowledge within American pop culture has influenced people’s real life perceptions of feminism. Arguably, this has defined what “the American dream” has been over the years, first being seen on the television
Read More >>
10-25-2018
Krystal Sarcone Volunteer
When originally prompted to work on a piece around “electoral feminism,” I thought surely I was just out of the lingo loop and that I must know what the phrase meant…I mean it’s right there, those two words are self-explanatory, right? But of the 4,050,000 Google search results that take 0.32 seconds to populate when looking for the term “electoral feminism” not a single link on the entire first page finds this exact phrase. Instead, the highlights include electoral and feminist geography,
Read More >>
08-30-2018
Alex Skidmore Policy amp Advocacy Committee Volunteer
There is a long history of female political activism in the United States, from earning the right to vote to running for political office. The anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment offers the opportunity to acknowledge that history and at the same time, to fight for an equitable and inclusive women’s political movement.Women have voted at higher percentage than men have in every presidential election since 1980, according to a Rutgers University study. And this trend exists even though women
Read More >>
08-09-2018
Casey Regan
Casey Regan spent her 2018 summer off from Bryant University with us at the Women's Fund of Rhode Island (WFRI). She wrote about what she learned here:Women say sorry too much. Myself included.From the time I was a kid until now, I’ve been saying sorry. Not just when I forget to load the dishwasher at home before my mom comes home from work, or when I cut someone off Route 295 on my way to college every morning. I’ve been saying sorry for everything - and I mean everything. Everything includes
Read More >>
08-06-2018
Alex Skidmore Policy amp Advocacy Committee Volunteer
Equal Pay Day is typically recognized in April as symbolizing how far into the following year women must work to catch up to what men make in a year. Though this day serves as an important reminder of the persistent gendered wage gap, the date ignores the even harsher pay disparity Black women face. While women overall earn 79 cents per male dollar, Black women make – their equal pay day falls on August 7, over three months after the April date. For Latina and Asian women, the disparities can be
Read More >>
04-09-2018
Cathy Plourde Writer Publisher amp Activist
Every day, the endless news cycle gives us a few more things to be against. It’s exhausting. So let’s talk about what might happen if we did more to support what we’re for.It’s time to join the Women’s Fund of Rhode Island (WFRI) in supporting the work of the RI Senators Goldin, Sosnowski, Miller, Calkin, and Nesselbush who’ve introduced S:274, Relating to Health & Safety- Reproductive Health Care Act. They’ve given me, and gave all of Rhode Island, something to stand up for.WFRI’s work focuses
Read More >>
04-02-2018
Kieu Anh Nguyen
When Title IX was passed in 1972, American educational institutions were required to recognize that women have the right to participate in sports on an equal plane with men. In the past 46 years, women in sports have proven time and time again that tenacity, passion, excellence, and the drive to overcome physical and social limitations know no gender.However, there are still battles to be won in the fight for gender equity in sports. Sexual objectification and harassment, unequal media coverage,
Read More >>
03-10-2018
Christina Castle
A millennial woman’s view of the widening gender pay gapIn 1869, a woman working as a government employee in Washington, D.C. wrote a letter to the editor of the New York Times. By lodging a complaint that her male colleagues were paid double her $900 salary for the same work, she set off a discussion that continues even now. In the nearly 150 years since her letter, protests, legislation, pledges, non-profit work, advocacy, and much more have been attempted to address the gender wage gap. But
Read More >>
02-26-2018
Galen Auer WFRI Volunteer
In the cultural climate of #MeToo and #TimesUp, an event hosted by the Women’s Fund of Rhode Island titled Cocktails and Conversations: Feminism is a Male Issue might justifiably raise a few eyebrows. It’s a topic that’s become a favorite quip of late-night comedians -- that men don’t know what they’re even allowed to say to women nowadays, for fear of being accused of sexual harassment.Beneath the stale one-liners, however, lies a legitimate dilemma: How do we engage men as allies against
Read More >>
01-18-2018
Kelly Nevins Executive Director Women39s Fund of Rhode Island
We’ve been hearing a lot about sexual harassment in the news lately. Powerful people, mainly white men, have been forcibly removed from their positions. The community at large is engaged in a conversation about how often harassment actually takes place, whether the level of harassment should result in being fired or removed from power and what this says about women’s place in our community overall.We’ve been here before. The passage of Title VII in 1964 prohibited sex discrimination in the
Read More >>
11-30-2017
Alex Skidmore Policy amp Advocacy Committee Volunteer
We’ve been hearing a lot about sexual harassment in the news lately. Powerful people, mainly white men, have been forcibly removed from their positions. The community at large is engaged in a conversation about how often harassment actually takes place, whether the level of harassment should result in being fired or removed from power and what this says about women’s place in our community overall.We’ve been here before. The passage of Title VII in 1964 prohibited sex discrimination in the
Read More >>
01-18-2016
Emily Mercurio
Sometimes, the government gives us little freebies, like national parks, public art, and federal holidays off work. Today many of us will get to enjoy the luxury of a long weekend on behalf of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the holiday which bears his name. Tempting as it may be to spend this free time relaxing or taking care of projects around the house, we as Americans are given this time so that we can honor Dr. King’s legacy in a meaningful way. His life was spent fighting to bring justice
Read More >>
11-10-2015
Jenn Steinfeld Executive Director
At the Women’s Fund of Rhode Island, we believe that greater racial and gender equality is good for our families, our community, and our economy. In fact, much of our work lately is focused on improving jobs, pay and working conditions for employees in the service sector, which has a huge impact on women’s economic security. Gender segregation in employment and wage discrimination are pronounced in these jobs; for example, U.S. Department of Labor statistics tell us that 88 percent of maids and
Read More >>
10-25-2015
Gretchen Bell Womens Policy Institute Class of 16
Participating in direct service work was an integral part of my college experience and as I look back, my professional career has been a consequence of one event in particular. One of the many service opportunities offered at my school, Loyola University, was a program called Care-A-Van. The program encouraged students to visit a homeless encampment in downtown Baltimore once a week bringing much needed food assistance along with the often overlooked benefits of conversation and companionship.
Read More >>
10-13-2015
Katharine Murphy
Election season is near—time to prepare to hit the polls and participate in the nationwide event the United States has been talking about for decades now. Suffrage in this country, as we are taught from young ages, is more than an individual endeavor solely undertaken by people interested in politics; suffrage is an integral element to democratic principles of government, giving civil society the power to choose who we want making political decisions that frame our lives. However, as we also are
Read More >>
08-26-2015
Jenn Steinfeld
Women have been able to cast their vote and voice their opinion in elections for nearly a century; it took almost that long to make this right a reality. Activists and reformers fought for women’s suffrage for nearly 100 years, overcoming many pitfalls and disagreements that threatened to destroy the movement. The 19th Amendment to the Constitution was finally ratified on August 26, 1920, enfranchising all American women and recognizing that they, being created equal, should be given a fair say
Read More >>
08-24-2015
Katharine Murphy
What feels like a long, but really quite short, 95 years ago, women in the United States acquired the right to vote. Following an immeasurable amount of effort put forth by women and men in favor of voting equality, women’s suffrage was scribed into our Constitution on August 26,1920. Critically speaking, voting access was not granted to every citizen simply because women’s suffrage made voting gender-inclusive. Initially the new ruling benefited only upper-class white women. It wasn’t until
Read More >>
08-11-2015
Gianna Jasinski
Structural and cultural barriers continue to hold women back today. Women have made great strides in the workforce, but inequality persists. A gender gap in access to opportunities and decision-making power between women and men still exists. . Specifically, in Rhode Island, 56% of minimum wage workers are women. 71% of families with children living in poverty are headed by women, 10% are headed by men, and 19% are headed by married couples. This wage gap has a significant impact on all women,
Read More >>
08-04-2015
Emily Rosello Mercurio
The gendered wage gap has, in recent years, become something of a feminist buzzword. People are talking about it every time they talk about equality; you’ll find the phrase on the first page of every Women’s Studies 101 syllabus, in every internet think piece about “Why I Need Feminism”, and on the lips of every celebrity making safe forays into public activism. I likely do not need to repeat here the statistic that women make $0.78 for every one dollar made by a man. At this point, everybody
Read More >>
06-26-2015
Jenn Steinfeld
Today's Supreme Court decision is an amazing leap forward in a movement that has been both agonizingly slow and lightning quick. The Women’s Fund has long recognized the very real linkages between misogyny, homophobia and transphobia. Back in 2003, when I helped to found Rhode Island’s Campaign for Marriage Equality, the Women’s Fund of Rhode Island was one of the first groups to stand with us. It took more than a decade, but in 2013 I was proud to be on the steps of the Rhode Island State House
Read More >>
06-19-2015
Emily Rosello Mercurio
Last week I walked into my job at a local sandwich shop to find all my coworkers gathered in the kitchen, passing around somebody’s phone and talking excitedly amongst themselves. Two of our coworkers had been expecting a baby together, and the child had finally been born that morning. Of course, everybody wanted to see the pictures they had sent. When I finally got hold of the phone, I couldn’t help but smile. The new parents seemed so overjoyed (albeit exhausted) to be holding their son after
Read More >>
05-08-2015
Farah Faye
Fifty-five years ago, Sirivamo Bandaranaike of Sri Lanka became the first woman elected president in the world. It’s a startling fact – one that is younger than my own grandparents. It wasn’t until they were my age that a woman was ever elected president. But even in their seventies, they have never seen a woman elected president in their own country. That is, unless Hillary Clinton surprises us all and wins the 2016 presidential election. It’s hard for me to come to terms with the
Read More >>
05-05-2015
Womens Fund
“Is there going to be a place for me to pump?!” After receiving multiple emails along these lines from Lady Project Summit participants, I was determined to find a way to provide accommodations for nursing and expecting mothers at this year’s conference,held this past weekend (April 18) in downtown Providence. This year’s conference sold out quickly, drawing more than 270 diverse young women from across the nation for a full day of speakers, workshops, and networking. Many of our participants
Read More >>
04-11-2015
Nancy Austin
"Girls Coding" is a great rallying cry as we push to prepare more tech-savvy women to fully engage the opportunities and challenges of the digital frontier. But let's not lose sight of the talent team we actually need to be mentoring as we collectively face this revolutionary moment of global technological change. The campaign to educate more female coders might still be a less effective generational return on investment (ROI) than thinking innovatively about how to create more effective teams
Read More >>
04-06-2015
Molly Savard
I’m driving behind an SUV when I notice three stickers plastered to its bumper. The first reads “NRA: STAND AND FIGHT;” the second is the Gadsden flag screaming “DON’T TREAD ON ME.” And the third? The Human Rights Campaign equal sign. I laugh because of how absurdly incongruous they seem together. Then I think, well, maybe he’s the well-meaning, gun-loving, Fox News-watching kind who probably believes marriage is between a man and a woman except when it comes to his gay nephew. Seemingly
Read More >>
04-02-2015
Bethany Imondi
2014 was a milestone year for the women of Rhode Island. In November, state voters made history when they elected Gina Raimondo governor. While the election of the Ocean State’s first female governor is notable, other inequities women wish were just bad April Fool’s jokes remain ingrained in our political system. While we’ve seen small but steady gains in women’s national political representation, progress among state leadership is meager. Prior to Raimondo’s election, only 35 women had ever
Read More >>
03-26-2015
Farah Faye
During my sophomore year of college, I pledged a sorority. My friends and family were surprised by my decision - I was never the “sorority type.” But this sorority prided itself on its no-hazing policy. This meant I would not have to deal with the excessive hazing rituals implemented by other Greek letter organizations: like the sorority that forced pledges to stand naked while fraternity boys circled their “impaired” body parts with sharpie markers, or the one that made pledges do
Read More >>
03-18-2015
Jenn Steinfeld
My name is Jenn Steinfeld and I am the Executive Director of the Women’s Fund of Rhode Island. The Women's Fund works every day to end gender bias and inequality in our state. We advocate for policy changes that create an equitable Rhode Island and promote women’s economic security. A critical aspect of leveling the playing field for women in the workforce is increased access to paid leave. In 2013, the Women’s Fund of Rhode Island and our Women’s Policy Institute fellows were instrumental in
Read More >>
03-17-2015
Alexandra Curran
In her acceptance speech for Best Supporting Actress at this year’s Academy Awards, Patricia Arquette championed women’s rights. “It’s our time to have wage equality once and for all and equal rights for women in the United States of America,” the Boyhood actress proclaimed. The crowd roared and feminists everywhere looked a lot like Meryl Streep and Jennifer Lopez, pumping our fists and nodding vigorously. It was an instant iconic feminist moment, the kind of moment that could reinvigorate the
Read More >>
02-03-2015
Molly Savard
I had a conversation with someone recently in which I was told I invested too much in language. We were talking about racism. My companion argued that white people can experience racism, while I argued that, by definition, racism is inapplicable to white people. I said white people can experience discrimination, but not racism. She pooh-poohed me and said, “That’s semantics. It’s all hatred.” In the moment, I didn’t know how to respond. How do you come back when your sparring partner invalidates
Read More >>
11-17-2014
Nancy Austin
What happens after that dreaded knock on the door? A new film by Rhode Island independent film maker, Mitty Griffis Mirrer, brings us into the world of the thousands of American children whose lives are forever changed after their family receives word that a parent has been killed in combat or died while on active duty service. What happens after? The subject of Mrs. Mirrer's new documentary is this world of the Gold Star children, as they are now referred to, and their oyster-like adaptations
Read More >>
11-11-2014
Molly Savard
You probably know today is Veterans Day, honoring the people who sacrifice their health and lives on our behalf in the struggle for a more peaceful world. You might not know, however, that November is chock-full of important historical dates for women, and for the U.S. Check out these recent notable dates and history-changing people that, like our veterans, signify the hope and bravery it takes to push for change. Nov. 1 - First medical school for women, the Boston Female Medical College, opened
Read More >>
10-21-2014
Bethany Imondi
Lined up against the wall, there we were, all dressed in the same uniform: khaki pants and a navy blue polo. A mix of high school students, our attention focused on the electric board before us that diagrammed the rows of seats before us. Then, when a light came on, one of us would rush to its source and respond accordingly. This experience of watching for the lights and running errands for the members of Rhode Island’s House of Representatives who lit them is responsible for my unabashed
Read More >>
10-12-2014
Farah Faye
The Niña, the Pinta the Santa Maria. Sound familiar? What about, “in 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue”? I’m sure that rings a bell for you. These are the things we are taught in elementary school about Christopher Columbus. As children, we spent time coloring in outlines of his famous three ships and learning about the fearless explorer’s adventure to the New World. We love him so much, we dedicate a whole day to him. But schools tend to “forget” to mention how cruel Christopher Columbus
Read More >>
10-07-2014
Nancy Austin
Recently I touched base with my friend Kathy to talk about the current state of the women’s movement. Kathy noticed things that needed tojust get done that weren’t being addressed. She asked: Why were people still debating some of the same feminist issues her generation had taken on decades earlier? Let’s get moving, she exclaimed impatiently! I responded from my broad-view perspective as a historian: I agree with you, Kathy. But isn’t it sobering to see the need to keep multi-generational
Read More >>
09-30-2014
Molly Savard
I identify as a political person who has, until recently, been checked out of mainstream politics. Keeping up with the two-party political theater whose tickets are sold primarily to Koch & Friends overwhelmed me. On a recent trip to the Democratic National Committee’s Women’s Leadership Forum Conference, however, I woke up. The upcoming midterm elections will directly impact the lives of women voters and candidates (including Rhode Island’s would-be first woman governor), and women will dictate
Read More >>
09-23-2014
Katharine Murphy
I struggle with self-expression and have internalized humility in a very extreme sense of the word. Growing up, I was taught to listen to others without involving myself, to put my priorities aside when others had it worse, and to avoid making anyone feel uncomfortable with my concerns. I recognize the same phenomenon happening all around me: people finding themselves either hesitant or unable to stand behind what they believe in. It's about time we pull everything out from under the rug. For
Read More >>
09-16-2014
Ailin Lu
"Nine Women Appointed as Supreme Court Justices" is a pseudo-headline that would elicit outrage across the nation. People would protest the unequal gender representation on the jury, and news anchors would dramatically announce, “This is a development that could radically change the way we interpret the Constitution.” I think it says a lot about us as a society that we can sit with the fact that all Supreme Court Justices were men for 239 years, and yet the thought of having all-female
Read More >>
09-10-2014
Farah Faye
I owe my feminist beliefs to my mother. An outspoken, strong-willed woman, my mom was never afraid to speak her mind. As a result of this, she set a boundless example for me, and for any future women that would ever be a part of my brother’s life. To have a voice was considered the norm for me. My belief that a woman should be equal to a man was considered common sense, not a revolution. And in my small corner of Long Island, I never knew that it was such a big deal to be a feminist. Wasn’t
Read More >>
09-03-2014
Nancy Austin
Show above: The second Union Station building (1898-1986) facing what is now Kennedy Plaza, Providence, Rhode Island. [Image: RI Secretary of State office] Over 150 years ago the governor of Rhode Island commissioned the portrait of a RI woman inventor for display in Union Station. It was part of his public history activism strategy to build support for equal economic opportunities for women in the state. It’s 1858 and the Rhode Island economy is still reeling from the Panic of 1857 - the first
Read More >>
08-12-2014
Molly Savard
It’s swimsuit season! Are you feeling bad about yourself yet? If you’re like most humans I know, you’re too bony, too curvy, too flat, too pale, too dark — basically, your kind should just stay away from the beach or pool. Or at least cover up that unattractive flesh. During and leading up to the summer months, we’re bombarded with headlines promoting “beach-ready bodies” (which, in my dictionary, means only “sunscreened”), as well as friends’ flattering selfies from the sand(hashtag you’re
Read More >>
08-07-2014
clientadmin
My 78-year-old grandmother recently moved from the Cape Verde Islands - an archipelago located off the West Coast of Africa - to our small state of Rhode Island. Even though she now resides here in New England, we are still constantly catching up. She tells me great tales about our relatives and friends back home, but I mostly share stories about the exciting work I feel so fortunate to be a part of here at the Women's Fund. So, yes, Grams (as I like to call her) knows all about the amazing
Read More >>
07-17-2014
clientadmin
My 78-year-old grandmother recently moved from the Cape Verde Islands - an archipelago located off the West Coast of Africa - to our small state of Rhode Island. Even though she now resides here in New England, we are still constantly catching up. She tells me great tales about our relatives and friends back home, but I mostly share stories about the exciting work I feel so fortunate to be a part of here at the Women's Fund. So, yes, Grams (as I like to call her) knows all about the amazing
Read More >>
07-15-2014
Molly Savard
My 78-year-old grandmother recently moved from the Cape Verde Islands - an archipelago located off the West Coast of Africa - to our small state of Rhode Island. Even though she now resides here in New England, we are still constantly catching up. She tells me great tales about our relatives and friends back home, but I mostly share stories about the exciting work I feel so fortunate to be a part of here at the Women's Fund. So, yes, Grams (as I like to call her) knows all about the amazing
Read More >>
< Prev
1 2 3 4 5 6
Next >
Show all
< Prev
1 2 3 4 5 6
Next >
Show all